Testimonials

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    When Hunny, a frisky Jack Russell Terrier, had her first exam at Wignall Animal Hospital this year, her mom, Alleah, was concerned about her bad breath. During her examination, Dr. Leigh DeMarco discovered part of the source: a cracked and infected tooth. Her “dental grade” was a score of “4”. Scores range from 1-4 and the higher the score, the more advanced the dental disease. At least one tooth definitely needed to be extracted, but dental x-rays would tell the whole story about the rest of Hunny’s teeth.

    Once she knew the reason, Hunny’s mom realized that Hunny’s recent whining and depressed, out of sorts behavior might be caused by dental pain. Hunny just had not seemed like herself lately. After her tooth was extracted under anesthesia, Hunny had an extensive dental cleaning, polishing and teeth sealing. She rested for a few days, then bounced back, playing more than ever! She was back to her old self again. Advice from Hunny’s mom about teeth care: Stay on top of it now!

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    Toby is senior domestic short haired cat who recently had a dental cleaning after his mom, Melanie, thought he was acting a little out of sorts from a skin irritation. When Dr. Leanza examined him, she found that Toby not only had skin issues, she also suspected that he had a resorptive lesion on a tooth. A resorptive lesion is one of the main reasons for cat tooth loss, gingivitis (gum disease) and chronic mouth pain. Veterinary dentists believe that even the smallest resorptive lesion causes pain! Dr. Leanza recommended the only effective treatment: full mouth xrays, a thorough dental cleaning and likely extraction of any diseased teeth. Toby rested the day after his dentistry and then bounced right back. He can eat dry food again and his mom now thinks he was in pain prior to his dental procedure. Her advice to other pet parents: “Definitely do it once a year and prevent extractions!”

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    Penny, a cute 3 year old miniature Doberman Pinscher, had her teeth cleaned this year after Dr. Detelich recommended the cleaning at Penny’s annual examination. Dr. D made the recommendation because she could see plaque built up on Penny’s teeth and she gave Penny a Dental Grade of “2″. A Grade 2 means that there are early signs of dental and gum disease and a cleaning is needed to bring the teeth and gums back to healthy condition. Fortunately for Penny, Dr. D. took a set of full mouth x-rays which revealed extensive bone loss for 7 of Penny’s teeth! This was serious and could not be seen without the x-rays. These teeth were extracted and the remaining teeth were scaled, cleaned, polished and sealed with Oravet®. Penny sailed through her next few days, wanted to eat hard crunchy food and Penny’s mom, Linda, couldn’t wait to get started with daily tooth brushing! Linda’s advice to other pet parents: “I recommend you brush their teeth every day to prevent the need for extensive cleanings and pets can actually enjoy brushings at home!”

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    Cookie is an 11 year old beagle whose mom, Nancy, was very concerned about Cookie’s teeth when Cookie had her annual examination this year with Dr. Leanza. Nancy reported that she thought Cookie’s teeth looked terrible, she had bad breath and she even thought she could see a crack in a tooth. Cookie’s Dental Grade was “4″, which is the most advanced level of suspected dental disease. Cookie’s mom wanted to have Cookie’s teeth cleaned and get to the bottom of the bad breath and cracked tooth. Cookie is considered a “Geriatric” pet, because she is over 10 years old. We took special care to perform specific blood and urine tests as part of her regular annual examination to ensure that Cookie was a good candidate for a dental cleaning. Her test results were great and she came through her dental cleaning like a champ! She had some teeth extracted, an extensive scaling, cleaning and polishing; as well as tooth sealant to protect her teeth. Cookie’s mom said afterwards, “It was worth it!”

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    Hannah’s mom, Bendy, thought Hannah was due for a dental cleaning based on the smell of Hannah’s breath! She also noticed that Hannah was not eating as well. Both of these—bad breath and decreased appetite—can be symptoms of illness. In Hannah’s case the cause was Grade III Dental Disease. Hannah is an adorable, black, 13 year old Dachshund. Because Hannah is a Geriatric Pet, we took all the proper precautions by running Senior Blood Tests and a Urinalysis, which we call a “Senior Screen”. The tests give us a good overall picture of Hannah’s health and her capacity to handle anesthesia. She passed! Her dental cleaning went smoothly; we extracted 4 diseased teeth, cleaned, polished and sealed her teeth. At her post-dental checkup, Dr. DeMarco gave Hannah’s teeth a Grade I, the best possible score! How did Hannah change after having her painful teeth extracted? Bendy reported, “The next day Hannah was hunting for food, playing with her toys more and eating better!” Bendy’s advice for other pet parents: “Dental care makes the dogs like puppies again! Playful and happy!”

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    Big Boy is a handsome 4 year old, grey and white tiger cat whose veterinarian, Dr. Detelich, recommended a dental cleaning. At his last physical examination, Big Boy’s Dental Grade was Grade II by Dr. Detelich. Grade II dental health means that there are early, reversible signs of dental disease and a cleaning and polishing are required to start treatment. The only thing Big Boy’s mom, Carol, had noticed was that Big Boy had been dropping pieces of dry food out of his mouth at mealtime. Other than that, she had not noticed anything else warning her that Big Boy had early dental disease, which left untreated, would become serious and painful. How did Big Boy respond to his clean, healthier teeth after his cleaning? Mom Carol said, “He was super cat! Extra playful with his companion cat; very snuggly and “purr-ful” with his “person!” She also noticed that he was no longer dropping food around his bowl which meant neater meal times and no more worry. Carol’s advice for other cat moms and dads? “Dental cleanings are important! Dental problems don’t just impact the mouth, but the entire wellbeing of your pet. Happy pets=happy owners!”

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    Lucy Fisher is a 7 year old Dilute Calico cat who recently had a dental cleaning. How did Lucy’s mom know a cleaning was needed? She noticed that Lucy was not playing as much and eating less, therefore she wondered if she was in pain and sick. Dr. Pikulik’s exam confirmed the source of discomfort was Lucy’s teeth and gums and she discussed the severe gingivitis and dental disease (infected tooth) with her mom during Lucy’s annual Senior Physical Exam. Lucy’s Dental Grade was Grade IV, the most advanced dental disease. After undergoing pre-anesthetic blood tests to ensure that Lucy could safety have anesthesia during her dental cleaning, Lucy came through her cleaning with flying colors. She had full mouth xrays before her cleaning, several teeth extracted, a complete scaling, cleaning and polishing. How did Lucy change after her dentistry? She was eating much better, which made Lucy’s mom feel she had done the right thing to get the dentistry done. What would Lucy’s mom tell other pet parents: “Get teeth cleaned! It’s important to your pet’s overall health!

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    Willow is a spry 8 year old Collie Mix who has had her teeth cleaned every year since she was 3 years old! Her Dental Grade at age 8 was Grade II! Outstanding for an 8 year old. Because she is a Senior Pet, she had her Annual Senior Physical Examination, as well as pre-anesthetic blood tests to ensure she was a suitable candidate for anesthesia. Her mom wondered if Willow needed her teeth cleaned this year because she had bad breath, an indicator of illness or dental disease. After examining Willow’s teeth, Dr. Pikulik explained that Willow was probably in some discomfort and a dental cleaning was recommended. She passed both her pre-dentistry tests and her dental cleaning with flying colors. How was Willow after her cleaning? Great! She was more active, playing more and even barked less often, all signs to her mom that Willow felt great! Advice to other pet parents? “If you feel your pet needs it, do it! It’s worth it and I would do it again!

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    Phoenix is a 7 year old Tabby who loves to eat! In fact, all 4 of the cats in the house eat in separate rooms because otherwise, the slower eaters would not stand a chance of getting a good meal. So, when Phoenix’s mom noticed she took 20-30 minutes to finish a meal recently, she really took notice. This continued for a week, every day, every meal. Mom was worried and wondered if Phoenix had a tooth issue, even though her teeth were beautifully white and looked healthy. When Dr. Laura Leanza examined Phoenix, she found 1 tooth with a resorptive lesion, which needed to be extracted. When Phoenix was X-rayed, Dr. Leanza found another tooth with a resorptive lesion that needed to be extracted. Mom’s advice to other pet owners: “Trust your judgment. If something seems to be wrong with your pet, have him/her checked out by your vet. I would highly recommend dental cleanings and X-rays because without the X-rays, one of Phoenix’s problem teeth would not have been found! She bounced right back after the procedure, ate well the same day and returned to her regular food within 1 week!”

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    Maxwell is a spunky 5 year old Shih Tzu for whom a dental cleaning was recommended early in 2011.  Maxwell’s dental score had gone from Grade I to Grade II over the course of a year.  His mom became concerned because the doctor could see that dental disease had begun.  She wanted Max to be healthy and hadn’t realized that dental disease, even in a younger dog like Max, could effect his overall health.  Her recommendations to other pet parents:” It is important to have good dental hygiene and cleaning so get your pets’ teeth cleaned like I did.  I want my Maxwell to be healthy!”